Grass after ammonia

Does Ammonia Kill Grass?

Ammonia is a great source of nitrogen for your grass. However, it also has the potential to kill said grass if the wrong type is applied or it’s not used properly. This being said, the obvious answer is yes – ammonia can kill the grass. In fact, it can do this quite easily if you aren’t careful.

So, to help you make the most of this powerful chemical, here is a breakdown of the most common types of ammonia that you might be tempted to use.

Ammonium Nitrate

Ammonium nitrate is a great source of nitrogen. It’s used in many fertilizer blends and is especially beneficial for fall and winter weed and feed application. This form of ammonia is best suited for grass that is already established and happy, as it releases nitrogen quickly, which can kill new seedlings or unhealthy grass.

With a nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium ratio of 33-0-0, ammonium nitrate fertilizers require applications of 3 pounds of product per every 1,000 square feet of area. This three-pound rule will supply your lawn with one pound of ammonium nitrate.

Common Household Ammonia

Ammonium hydroxide is the compound found within common household cleaners and it is most commonly used to create homemade lawn tonics. This powerful solution can, without a doubt, kill your grass easily. Depending on the brand of ammonia, the concentration in every product will be different which makes it incredibly easy to burn your lawn if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Unlike other types of ammonia, household ammonia doesn’t supply grass with enough nitrogen for there to be a benefit, as it has to be applied in small quantities to prevent the burns we mentioned before. This being said, it’s not usually a gardener’s go-to for ammonia products.

Ammonium Sulfate

Ammonium sulfate isn’t usually used in commercial grass fertilizers because it has a tendency to cause acidity changes within the soil. It’s generally used to lower pH levels to promote the growth of acid-loving plants.

To supply grass with one pound of chemical, one must use five pounds of products with this chemical. In addition, over-application is likely to cause chemical burns in the grass, so you have to be careful when applying and/or reapplying as overdoing it isn’t hard to do.

Garden ammonia fertilizers

Ammonium Phosphate Sulfate

Ammonium phosphate sulfate is a gentler form of nitrogen, which makes it ideal for newer and younger grasses. It’s commonly used before planting new grass seed or to kick start the growth of new grass. It contains less nitrogen than ammonium nitrate but also supplies some beneficial phosphorus.

When it comes to using, six pounds of the product will yield one pound of nitrogen per every 1,000 square feet. Of all the common ammonia used, this one is the least likely to burn or kill the grass.

Who knew that there were so many forms of ammonia, right? Well, no worries – now you know! You can now safely choose the best type of ammonia-based product for you and your needs.

Dandelions

Natural Ways to Kill Dandelions Without Killing the Grass

When it comes to killing broadleaf weeds like dandelions, not everyone wants to run to the store and purchase a chemical product to do the job. If that sounds like you, you might be wondering how you can kill those pesky weeds without causing damage to your grass.

We can help with that! It’s important though, as you read through our list of natural weed killers, that you remember to always do your best to avoid applying any weed killers – natural or not- to healthy grass or flowers because, unfortunately, even natural weed killers can kill the grass if contact is made. Otherwise, though, you don’t have to worry – your natural homemade dandelion killers won’t kill the grass as long as you don’t spray them there.

Salt

While not the most ideal treatment for the lawn, salt is a great option for killing weeds that pop up in your garden path or driveway, both of which are likely in close proximity to grass that you’d probably rather not kill. Luckily, when salt is used as a weed killer it won’t spread to any other areas.

Simply gather up rock or table salt and apply. Be careful not to use too much, as doing so can cause concrete to erode and soil to be barren for long periods of time.

Goats eating dandelions

Goats

Have you ever thought about buying a goat as a pet? No? How about as a professional weed killer? If not, now might be the time! Goats are wonderful at helping control weeds. They don’t care what kind of weeds they chow down on and can reach places that both people and machines have a hard time getting to. Best of all, though, is that they won’t kill the grass. 

Vinegar

Vinegar is an all-natural method of killing weeds. However, it’s non-selective and will kill any and all vegetation it touches. This is why it’s important to take care when applying it. Nevertheless, a simple solution of vinegar and water does wonders to dry up pesky weeds.

Dinner

Now that you’re considering owning a goat or two, why not take it to the next step and bring the weeds inside? Surprisingly, many weeds are edible (dandelions, for example). They can be made into teas, put into soups, fried, or eaten washed and raw in delicious salads. Incorporating them into your meals won’t do any harm to the grass and might even save you a few dollars at the grocery store.

Pulled out dandelions

Weed Puller

If all else fails, get out into the yard with a weed puller. These handy little contraptions have long handles and sharp blades that cut through the soil to grip the roots of weeds. All you have to do to remove the weed is push the puller into the ground, perhaps give it a twist, and pull it out. Whoila! The entire weed is gone.

Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is much like vinegar; it is potent, natural, and easy to get your hands on. You can use concentrated lemon juice from the grocery store or fresh juice from whole lemons. Carefully apply the juice to the weeds and watch the magic happen.

Mowing lawn at day

What Time Can I Mow My Lawn?: The Best and Worst Times To Cut the Grass

When it comes to lawn maintenance, there are a number of factors that should be considered. Today, though, we’re discussing the time of day. If you’ve never factored the time of day and its corresponding weather into your decision of whether or not to go out and cut the grass, maybe it’s time that you do.

Below, you’ll find some helpful information about the best and worst times of day in which to mow your lawn or do any kind of lawn maintenance.

Best

8:00 – 10:00 am

Starting with the beginning of the day, one of the most optimal times to mow your lawn is from 8:00 to 10:00 am. You may have heard that “the earlier the better”, but this is only true to an extent; mowing too early can be a problem, which we’ll get into a bit later.

8:00 to 10:00 am is one of the best times because, by that point in the morning, the previous night’s dew and moisture have begun to evaporate, making the grass dry enough to mow. In addition, it’s generally just starting to warm up during this time but won’t be too hot.

4:00 – 6:00 pm

Coming in second best is the window between 4:00 and 6:00 pm. By this time of day, the temperature should have reached its peak and be steadily decreasing. Your lawn will also have a few hours to recover from the trauma of being mowed before nightfall, which is a bonus.

The only thing with this time of day, though, is that it tends to be a prime time for the emergence of bugs like mosquitoes.

Mowing lawn at night

Worst

6:00 – 8:00 am

This early in the morning, even though it’s not hot outside and there are likely very few bugs, you’re going to run into more trouble than it’s worth if you try to mow your lawn. The main problem here is that the grass is wet.

This can lead to your mower leaving tracks in the grass as well as wet grass clogging your mower’s motor.

 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Although there is nothing really wrong with mowing your lawn during this window of time, it’s best practice to void it if at all possible. As we mentioned before, your lawn needs time to recover before temperatures dip too low during the night.

Mowing so close to nightfall means that your lawn has very little time to recover. This is important because lawns are most prone to damage during the night, so if it hasn’t fully recovered from mowing, it’s more likely to become sick and/or die.

While there are certainly good and bad times to mow the lawn, no one is telling you when to do it. The decision is solely up to you, the mower, and factors such as where you live, the current weather patterns, and your individual schedule should come into play as well as our recommendations.