Lawn fertilizers for vegetable garden

Can I Use Lawn Fertilizer in My Garden?

After treating your grass, you’re probably going to have some extra lawn fertilizer just hanging around and taking up space. So, you might be thinking that it makes sense to use the extra in your garden, right?

Sure. The question is, though, should you? The answer is, unfortunately, not as clear as we’d like it to be. This is due to the fact that no two fertilizers, people, or situations are the same, which leaves room for there to be two sides to the debate. 

Today, we’re diving into both sides of the argument and going over a few pros and cons of both using lawn fertilizer for the garden and not using it for the garden. 

Lawn Fertilizer for the Garden

Convenient 

There’s no doubt about it — using lawn fertilizer for the garden is super convenient. Instead of purchasing separate fertilizer, all you have to do is move from lawn to garden with one product. This means that you won’t have multiple bottles of fertilizer or applicators laying around. 

Affordable

Using the same fertilizer for both the lawn and garden is a no-brainer when it comes to saving money because let’s face it, who wants to buy two products when you could get away with using just one? No one! 

Stronger solution

Most lawn fertilizers are more concentrated than the average garden fertilizer. This means that you can get away with applying less product less frequently. 

Higher risk of burns

When you use lawn fertilizer in the garden, you run the risk of burning your plants. This is because of the compounds in the lawn fertilizer; they are often too strong and concentrated for non-grass flowers to thrive with their application. 

Questionable benefits

According to some experts, lawn fertilizer is essentially useless on garden plants. Again, this goes back to the makeup of each lawn fertilizer and the fact that lawn fertilizers are made for grasses, which are more robust and durable than most flowers.

Some gardeners, on the other hand, swear by using lawn fertilizer in both areas. 

Garden plant with fertilizers

Avoiding Lawn Fertilizer for the Garden

Guaranteed safety

When you use organic lawn fertilizers in the garden, you might be worried that your edible garden plants will be rendered unsafe for consumption. Using garden fertilizer, however, you can rest assured that the product is safe for your edible plants — and yourself.

Gentler on plants

Garden fertilizer is generally composed with the sensitive nature of the plants it is tailored to in mind. This being said, it’s less concentrated and gentler on both the plants and the soil around them. 

More applications

With a formula that is less concentrated, you might need to reapply garden fertilizer more than one to get the desired results. Depending on your schedule and patience, this can be a major problem or simply a small inconvenience. 

So, all in all, it’s up to you whether you use lawn fertilizer in your garden or not. There is an overwhelming amount of evidence against and for the idea, so it’s impossible to say for sure which one is the best.

Humidity in grow tent

How to Increase the Humidity in a Grow Tent

Watching your plants dry out and with away is nothing short of heartbreaking. The entire situation is a nightmare for anyone who spends time and effort growing plants – especially when you spend the money to buy a grow tent in which your plants still manage to dry up.

So, how can you increase the humidity in your grow tent? Here are a few easy suggestions.

Add additional water sources

As a general rule of thumb, the more water surface an area has, the more humid the area will be. This applies to your grow tent.

So, an easy way to increase the humidity in your grow tent is by increasing the water surface area. It can be done by placing bowls of water in various spots within the tent. A few of the best places to place these bowls are by air ducts and other passive air holes, as the airflow will help increase the evaporation of the water. 

Install a humidifier

Humidifiers can be a good option for increasing humidity. To ensure that your humidifier doesn’t produce too much humidity, consider installing a humidistat alongside it. Together, these two pieces of equipment can take the stress out of humidity management.

Switch out the flooring

Switch out the flooring? That’s right! Another easy way to bring the humidity up is by changing the flooring you use in your grow tent. As you may know, some materials have a tendency to stay damper than others and so, why not switch out your moisture-wicking flooring for something that holds more humidity? Something like soil will work well.

Fluorescent lights in grow tent

Remove fluorescent lights

Lightbulbs and light bars can suck the humidity out of a room like no one’s business. This being said, if you have an entire room of fluorescent lights, you may want to consider reducing the amount of light in the room by half. This will help keep the temperature a little cooker, which will, in turn, increase the level of humidity within the air.  

Spray your tent walls

Instead of just spraying your plants, spray the walls of your grow tent, too. Doing this increases the moist surface area within the tent, which raises humidity and keep your plants happy and healthy. The walls will hold on to more moisture than you think they would.

Use a fan

Although fans are commonly used for their intended purpose – cooling -, they can also be used to increase the humidity in your grow tent. By having a fan going in the tent on a low speed, you improve air circulation which increases its ability to retain moisture.

With any luck, our list has helped you find a few new methods to battle low humidity. Any and all of the suggestions above can work wonders if they are done properly and consistently.

Grass after ammonia

Does Ammonia Kill Grass?

Ammonia is a great source of nitrogen for your grass. However, it also has the potential to kill said grass if the wrong type is applied or it’s not used properly. This being said, the obvious answer is yes – ammonia can kill the grass. In fact, it can do this quite easily if you aren’t careful.

So, to help you make the most of this powerful chemical, here is a breakdown of the most common types of ammonia that you might be tempted to use.

Ammonium Nitrate

Ammonium nitrate is a great source of nitrogen. It’s used in many fertilizer blends and is especially beneficial for fall and winter weed and feed application. This form of ammonia is best suited for grass that is already established and happy, as it releases nitrogen quickly, which can kill new seedlings or unhealthy grass.

With a nitrogen-phosphorus-potassium ratio of 33-0-0, ammonium nitrate fertilizers require applications of 3 pounds of product per every 1,000 square feet of area. This three-pound rule will supply your lawn with one pound of ammonium nitrate.

Common Household Ammonia

Ammonium hydroxide is the compound found within common household cleaners and it is most commonly used to create homemade lawn tonics. This powerful solution can, without a doubt, kill your grass easily. Depending on the brand of ammonia, the concentration in every product will be different which makes it incredibly easy to burn your lawn if you don’t know what you’re doing.

Unlike other types of ammonia, household ammonia doesn’t supply grass with enough nitrogen for there to be a benefit, as it has to be applied in small quantities to prevent the burns we mentioned before. This being said, it’s not usually a gardener’s go-to for ammonia products.

Ammonium Sulfate

Ammonium sulfate isn’t usually used in commercial grass fertilizers because it has a tendency to cause acidity changes within the soil. It’s generally used to lower pH levels to promote the growth of acid-loving plants.

To supply grass with one pound of chemical, one must use five pounds of products with this chemical. In addition, over-application is likely to cause chemical burns in the grass, so you have to be careful when applying and/or reapplying as overdoing it isn’t hard to do.

Garden ammonia fertilizers

Ammonium Phosphate Sulfate

Ammonium phosphate sulfate is a gentler form of nitrogen, which makes it ideal for newer and younger grasses. It’s commonly used before planting new grass seed or to kick start the growth of new grass. It contains less nitrogen than ammonium nitrate but also supplies some beneficial phosphorus.

When it comes to using, six pounds of the product will yield one pound of nitrogen per every 1,000 square feet. Of all the common ammonia used, this one is the least likely to burn or kill the grass.

Who knew that there were so many forms of ammonia, right? Well, no worries – now you know! You can now safely choose the best type of ammonia-based product for you and your needs.

Dandelions

Natural Ways to Kill Dandelions Without Killing the Grass

When it comes to killing broadleaf weeds like dandelions, not everyone wants to run to the store and purchase a chemical product to do the job. If that sounds like you, you might be wondering how you can kill those pesky weeds without causing damage to your grass.

We can help with that! It’s important though, as you read through our list of natural weed killers, that you remember to always do your best to avoid applying any weed killers – natural or not- to healthy grass or flowers because, unfortunately, even natural weed killers can kill the grass if contact is made. Otherwise, though, you don’t have to worry – your natural homemade dandelion killers won’t kill the grass as long as you don’t spray them there.

Salt

While not the most ideal treatment for the lawn, salt is a great option for killing weeds that pop up in your garden path or driveway, both of which are likely in close proximity to grass that you’d probably rather not kill. Luckily, when salt is used as a weed killer it won’t spread to any other areas.

Simply gather up rock or table salt and apply. Be careful not to use too much, as doing so can cause concrete to erode and soil to be barren for long periods of time.

Goats eating dandelions

Goats

Have you ever thought about buying a goat as a pet? No? How about as a professional weed killer? If not, now might be the time! Goats are wonderful at helping control weeds. They don’t care what kind of weeds they chow down on and can reach places that both people and machines have a hard time getting to. Best of all, though, is that they won’t kill the grass. 

Vinegar

Vinegar is an all-natural method of killing weeds. However, it’s non-selective and will kill any and all vegetation it touches. This is why it’s important to take care when applying it. Nevertheless, a simple solution of vinegar and water does wonders to dry up pesky weeds.

Dinner

Now that you’re considering owning a goat or two, why not take it to the next step and bring the weeds inside? Surprisingly, many weeds are edible (dandelions, for example). They can be made into teas, put into soups, fried, or eaten washed and raw in delicious salads. Incorporating them into your meals won’t do any harm to the grass and might even save you a few dollars at the grocery store.

Pulled out dandelions

Weed Puller

If all else fails, get out into the yard with a weed puller. These handy little contraptions have long handles and sharp blades that cut through the soil to grip the roots of weeds. All you have to do to remove the weed is push the puller into the ground, perhaps give it a twist, and pull it out. Whoila! The entire weed is gone.

Lemon Juice

Lemon juice is much like vinegar; it is potent, natural, and easy to get your hands on. You can use concentrated lemon juice from the grocery store or fresh juice from whole lemons. Carefully apply the juice to the weeds and watch the magic happen.

Mowing lawn at day

What Time Can I Mow My Lawn?: The Best and Worst Times To Cut the Grass

When it comes to lawn maintenance, there are a number of factors that should be considered. Today, though, we’re discussing the time of day. If you’ve never factored the time of day and its corresponding weather into your decision of whether or not to go out and cut the grass, maybe it’s time that you do.

Below, you’ll find some helpful information about the best and worst times of day in which to mow your lawn or do any kind of lawn maintenance.

Best

8:00 – 10:00 am

Starting with the beginning of the day, one of the most optimal times to mow your lawn is from 8:00 to 10:00 am. You may have heard that “the earlier the better”, but this is only true to an extent; mowing too early can be a problem, which we’ll get into a bit later.

8:00 to 10:00 am is one of the best times because, by that point in the morning, the previous night’s dew and moisture have begun to evaporate, making the grass dry enough to mow. In addition, it’s generally just starting to warm up during this time but won’t be too hot.

4:00 – 6:00 pm

Coming in second best is the window between 4:00 and 6:00 pm. By this time of day, the temperature should have reached its peak and be steadily decreasing. Your lawn will also have a few hours to recover from the trauma of being mowed before nightfall, which is a bonus.

The only thing with this time of day, though, is that it tends to be a prime time for the emergence of bugs like mosquitoes.

Mowing lawn at night

Worst

6:00 – 8:00 am

This early in the morning, even though it’s not hot outside and there are likely very few bugs, you’re going to run into more trouble than it’s worth if you try to mow your lawn. The main problem here is that the grass is wet.

This can lead to your mower leaving tracks in the grass as well as wet grass clogging your mower’s motor.

 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Although there is nothing really wrong with mowing your lawn during this window of time, it’s best practice to void it if at all possible. As we mentioned before, your lawn needs time to recover before temperatures dip too low during the night.

Mowing so close to nightfall means that your lawn has very little time to recover. This is important because lawns are most prone to damage during the night, so if it hasn’t fully recovered from mowing, it’s more likely to become sick and/or die.

While there are certainly good and bad times to mow the lawn, no one is telling you when to do it. The decision is solely up to you, the mower, and factors such as where you live, the current weather patterns, and your individual schedule should come into play as well as our recommendations.